We the People: Whose Constitution is it Anyway? - The Constitutional Fix to a Constitutional Problem by G. R. Mobley

We the People: Whose Constitution is it Anyway? - The Constitutional Fix to a Constitutional Problem by G. R. Mobley from  in  category
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Author: G. R. Mobley
Category: History
ISBN: 9781626757202
Publisher: Bookbaby
File Size: 3.68 MB
Format: EPUB (e-book)
DRM: Applied (Requires eSentral Reader App)
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Sinopsis

"We the People: Whose Constitution is it Anyway" provides hope for America and asserts that within the Constitution lays the fix for a renewed Constitutional Republic. No longer do enough Americans question the roles, responsibilities, powers, and actions of the Federal government. Consequently, "We the People: Whose Constitution is it Anyway" fills the many voids for today’s Libertarians; it calls upon Republicans and all good Patriots to realign with “republican or founding” principles and calls out the secular progressive for their failed communist ideologies, which are destroying America. Methodically, "We the People: Whose Constitution is it Anyway" builds the case that under the nose of the American public, the secular progressives within the Federal Government has erected a national church based upon their ideologies and that these ideologies have been inculcated into the American culture as main stream thought for several decades. "We the People: Whose Constitution is it Anyway" is a play book for Patriots to organize and transform grass root organizations like the Tea Party into a formidable movement of individual liberty and sovereignty. Madison clearly argued the need for the Republic to return to Constitutional Conventions when our Federal Government steps beyond its enumerated boundaries. However, "We the People: Whose Constitution is it Anyway" asserts there is no need to send delegates and assemble in a central location for what could become a target of opportunity for enemies to undermine or attack the Republic. Brilliantly, "We the People: Whose Constitution is it Anyway" pushes the conventional roles of a Republic into twenty-first century technology to return more controls back to the States and the people.

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